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H~W
ARE Y~U,
REALLY?

It’s crucial for people living with mental health
conditions to know they’re not alone.

SHARE YOUR STORY

IMMIGRANT
STUDENTS

1/

As immigrant students return to school amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, many are experiencing increased mental stress and significantly limited support resources. We recognize students from all backgrounds might be feeling these emotions; however, BIPOC students and immigrants are at particular risk because of the inequalities prevalent in today’s society.

We are sharing these stories to amplify the injustices immigrants face in our country, while also highlighting their resilience and how many persevere despite these odds. Everyone deserves access to culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health care.

As immigrant students return to school amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, many are experiencing increased mental stress and significantly limited support resources. We recognize students from all backgrounds might be feeling these emotions; however, BIPOC students and immigrants are at particular risk because of the inequalities prevalent in today’s society.

We are sharing these stories to amplify the injustices immigrants face in our country, while also highlighting their resilience and how many persevere despite these odds. Everyone deserves access to culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health care.

Artwork by Brian Herrera

View Stories
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Arij Johri
Arij Johri
Watch story

Student Immigrant from Pakistan
.
“Mentally there is so much going on, yet I don’t know if I have the right to express it.”

Momo

Student Immigrant from Nicaragua
.
“I just don’t feel supported or accepted in this country, sadly, because of the lack of resources.”

Youssef El Mosalami
Youssef El Mosalami
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Student Immigrant from Egypt
.
“The lack of resources and stigma against mental health and therapy support has always been something that impacted me…”

Pierluigi Mancini, PhD
Pierluigi Mancini, PhD
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President, Multicultural Development Institute
.
“It’s difficult enough to be an immigrant. Difficult enough to be a student. Racism, discrimination, bias and prejudice make it worse.”

Sadhana Singh
Sadhana Singh
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Program & Communications Manager at TheDream.US
.
“You want to give so much of yourself, but you also must give to yourself.”

Carley Tucker
Carley Tucker
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Senior Program Associate at Golden Door Scholars
.
“Your immigration status should not dictate whether you have access to mental health services.”

Stephen Chen
Stephen Chen
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Student Immigrant from Taiwan
.
“Going back to school under this kind of uncertainty…I’m worried that I might lose focus or I might not perform as well.”

Fabiola Garcia
Fabiola Garcia
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Student Immigrant from Mexico
.
.”I did not choose to be born somewhere else. I chose to be a good person.”

Arij Johri
Arij Johri
Watch story
Momo
Youssef El Mosalami
Youssef El Mosalami
Watch story
Pierluigi Mancini, PhD
Pierluigi Mancini, PhD
Watch story
Sadhana Singh
Sadhana Singh
Watch story
Carley Tucker
Carley Tucker
Watch story
Stephen Chen
Stephen Chen
Watch story
Fabiola Garcia
Fabiola Garcia
Watch story

How to
safely share
your story:

1
Make sure you're ready to talk about your mental health story. If you don't want to talk about your mental health experience or journey, you don't have to. The choice is completely up to you.
2
You may use this platform to share publicly, or to keep your stories private for yourself. If you decide to share your experience publicly, your story will be available on the website for anyone logged in to see.
3
Define your key message. Think about what you would like the audience to know about your story. We want to hear your authentic voice, but we also want to offer an inspiring message of hope to those hearing your personal experience.
4
Educate your network. People may see your story and reach out for help. Remember, there are many resources to direct them to. If you feel they are in crisis, recommend Crisis Text Line, a free 24/7 confidential crisis intervention service via SMS. Text COALITION to 741741 to speak to a trained crisis counselor.
How to talk about mental health

IN AN
EMERGENCY

If you or a friend need urgent assistance, call 911 immediately, or take your friend directly to the emergency room. If you feel it’s safe, stay with your friend, or find someone to stay with them until help arrives.

Call 911

IN A
CRISIS

You are never alone. Help is always available. For immediate support 24/7, reach out to the Crisis Text Line by texting COALITION to 741741, or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. It’s free and it’s highly confidential, unless it’s essential to contact emergency services to keep you or your friend safe.

Call 1-800-273-8255

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